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Environment and PD





A recent study conducted by researchers from top universities has identified 10 pesticides that can cause significant damage to neurons, potentially leading to the development of Parkinson's disease. The pesticides include four insecticides, three herbicides, and three fungicides, many of which are still in use today. Prolonged exposure to Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chemical found in water, air, and soil, has been linked to a 70% increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. TCE has also been associated with certain cancers. It was used for industrial and commercial purposes for the past century and as a surgical anaesthesia until it was banned in 1977. Currently, it is primarily used as a degreasing solvent. Additionally, a common bacteria found in wet, boggy environments has been found to release compounds that trigger the formation of toxic protein clumps in the brain, potentially contributing to Parkinson's disease. The severity of the disease was observed to increase with higher concentrations of Desulfovibrio bacterial strains in patients' feces. These findings highlight the potential risks associated with certain pesticides, chemicals, and bacterial strains in relation to Parkinson's disease. Further research is necessary to better understand these connections and develop strategies for prevention and mitigation.

Following are some of the interesting articles:


1)

Be watchful about pesticides

Researchers from top universities have identified 10 pesticides that can significantly damage neurons that can lead to development of Parkinson’s disease. The 10 pesticides identified as directly toxic to these neurons included: four insecticides (dicofol, endosulfan, naled, propargite), three herbicides (diquat, endothall, trifluralin), and three fungicides (copper sulfate [basic and pentahydrate] and folpet). Most of the pesticides are still in use today.

Following is the link to the original source:



2)

Watch out for chemical exposure

Two years of prolonged exposure of Trichloroethylene (TCE), which is found in water, air and soil, may increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s Disease by 70%. TCE has also been linked to certain cancers. For the last 100 years, TCE has been used for industrial and commercial purposes. It was also used as surgical anaesthesia until it was banned in 1977. Its current use is primarily as degreasing solvent.

Following is the link to the detailed report:




3)

A common aquatic bacterium could pose a risk!

A common bacteria found in wet, boggy environments may pose a risk to people by excreting compounds that trigger rogue protein in brain to form toxic clumps. Scientists found that severity of Parkinson’s Disease increased with increased concentrations of Desulfovibrio bacterial strains in patient’s feces.

Following is the link to the original source:


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